Innovation Happens @ ASU

 

 

 

How will you innovate at ASU?

Episode 60

In our final episode of Season 2, our guest is none other than our producer Maggie Dellow. Hear about her experience in launching the podcast, and what she has learned about innovation from our many amazing guests. Maggie and Jonah review some of the "myths" around innovation they uncovered during Seasons 1 and 2, and how the podcast guests have debunked those myths and demonstrated the grit and resiliency inherent to the innovative mindset. We also review some of our favorite moments of the podcast so far. Best wishes to Maggie in her future endeavors...and stay tuned, Season 3 is right around the corner!

Have you downloaded the Sun Devil Rewards app? Each week we provide you with a "secret word" valid for 100 Pitchfork Points good for redeeming ASU gear and VIP experiences. This episode's Sun Devil Rewards "secret word" will expire at 11:59 pm on Thursday, September 5, 2019. 

Episode 59

When Michele Clark began looking into doctoral programs, she found a National Science Foundation grant that focused not only on the ecology of an area, but the human dimension of the community members living within it, as well. She found at ASU an interdisciplinary team of demographers, soil ecologists, and governance scholars, focused on invasive species research in Nepal, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in Environmental Life Sciences.

Developing nations have fewer resources to counteract invasive species, but for whom the invasion can have devastating impacts on their quality of life. Invasive plants are non-native species that are either intentionally or unintentionally introduced to an ecology, and can cause detrimental impacts to the health of people living in the area, the economy, and the surrounding environment. Invasive species are like a plant-based horror movie: nearly indestructible aliens marching across the land, causing irreparable harm. Named by the Nepali people “tree killer”, the invasive vine, mikania micrantha, has done a shocking amount of damage to jungle in the study area. From the very beginning, the research team innovated by not chasing the most statistically significant technique, but instead searching for the ones that would be most impactful for the community. They did so by involving the Nepali people in building a toolkit to help reduce this invasion. As Michele describes it, it’s more of a “technique kit”, which allows the local community members to know what to do, and how to do it…long after the research team has left.

Listen in to hear how Michele found a shared passion for community-based innovation at ASU, and how those innovations can not only inspire and support local communities, but also how research teams can, in turn, be inspired by communities, as well.  

 

Recommended if you're interested in: Community-based research and innovation, invasive plant species, Nepal and Nepali culture, community-infused techniques and outcomes

Have you downloaded the Sun Devil Rewards app? Each week we provide you with a "secret word" valid for 100 Pitchfork Points good for redeeming ASU gear and VIP experiences. This episode's Sun Devil Rewards "secret word" will expire at 11:59 pm on Monday, August 19th, 2019.

 

Episode 58

For students Anne-Marie Shaver (PhD in Musicology) and Hunter Langenhorst (undergraduate student in Music and Culture, and Spanish literature), music has long been an important part of life. The Acoustic Ecology Lab offers unique ways to embrace that passion. “Every single sound we hear has its sonic niche. Whether it’s the birds chirping, or the wind, or gravel creaking as people walk…every single sound has a frequency,” Hunter explains. “Losing that special frequency can give us hints about what is happening in the environment, and the ecology, in that place. Studying those sounds, or lack of sounds, is what the lab does.” Simply put, the Acoustic Ecology Lab is using sound to understand what is happening in our environments. Stemming from the pioneering work of Dr. Garth Paine in Acoustic Ecology, and with the help and vision of co-director Professor Sabine Feisst, the lab features an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, engineers, music enthusiasts, and environmentalists.  Learn about the lab’s Sound Walks, how measuring gunshot sounds can prevent poachers and save jaguars, and other amazing interdisciplinary projects at the Lab.

Recommended if you're interested in: Interdisciplinary approaches, using empathy and sound to connect and explore, environmental and social passions

Have you downloaded the Sun Devil Rewards app? Each week we provide you with a "secret word" valid for 100 Pitchfork Points good for redeeming ASU gear and VIP experiences. This episode's Sun Devil Rewards "secret word" will expire at 11:59 pm on Friday, August 9th, 2019.

Episode 57

This ground-breaking magazine started humbly in 2016 by a small team with sponsorship by Dr. Amanda Tachine.  The passion, drive and discipline of this multi-disciplinary team of students gives voice and presence to Native American and Indigenous students in a beautifully-designed, thought-filled and powerful medium. The team includes Sequoia Dance, a recent graduate of the Masters in Social & Cultural Pedagagy program; Taylor Notah, the Senior Editor of the magazine and recent graduate of the Cronkite School of Journalism; Danielle Lucero, a current PhD student in the Justice and Social Inquiry program; and Brian Skeet, a recent graduate with a degree in Industrial Design and Design Management from the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts. Turning Point highlights resources available to Native students, as well as student narratives that create a sense of belonging and community. The magazine highlights Native students on college campuses across the US – to bring forward resources, narratives, and stories that usually go whispered, and don’t always get to be the center of attention.

Recommended if you're interested in: Narratives and the power of story-telling; Native student experiences; designing and maintaining a vibrant magazine community  

Have you downloaded the Sun Devil Rewards app? Each week we provide you with a "secret word" valid for 100 Pitchfork Points good for redeeming ASU gear and VIP experiences. This episode's Sun Devil Rewards "secret word" will expire at 11:59 pm on Friday, August 2nd, 2019.

Episode 56
ICE in Indonesia

Native Phoenician James Cook, a mechanical engineering systems student, shares his experiences in a multi-year use-inspired research project. Through the GlobalResolve service abroad program at Barrett, the Honors College, students are able to engage in interdisciplinary projects focused on “bridging the global divide with sustainable and collaborative solutions”. For James, what started as simply meeting a mandatory course requirement turned into a 3-semester long passion project focused on finding sustainable, innovative ways to preserve fish for local fishermen in Indonesia. The research team created a solar-thermal, ammonia-based ice generator using cheap materials, allowing for fisherman to quickly freeze their fish to maintain freshness. Along the way, they partnered with an Indonesian university and made lifelong friends. Listen in as James shares stories of traveling the world, using humanitarian engineering to make a meaningful difference, and what living the innovation mindset means to him.

Recommended if you're interested in: global impact, use-inspired research projects, humanitarian engineering

Have you downloaded the Sun Devil Rewards app? Each week we provide you with a "secret word" valid for 100 Pitchfork Points good for redeeming ASU gear and VIP experiences. This episode's Sun Devil Rewards "secret word" will expire at 11:59 pm on Friday, July 26th, 2019.